Seismic survey in Victoria to improve infrastructure and maintenance

A major seismic survey has begun in north-east Victoria to improve infrastructure construction and maintenance and future mineral exploration.

Scientists from the Geological Survey of Victoria have begun a 500-kilometre study with specialised trucks conduct a survey from Benalla eastwards. A major seismic survey has begun in north-east Victoria to improve infrastructure construction and maintenance and future mineral exploration.

Three trucks are equipped with vibrating metal plates which generate soundwaves that penetrate through underground rock layers to a depth of 50 kilometres. The convoy, along with support vehicles, move slowly and stop every 40 metres to gather this data.

The soundwaves bounce back to the surface and are recorded by sensitive microphones to provide scientists with a picture of the rock formations under the surface.

This data helps fill the Victorian Government’s knowledge on the state’s geology that can improve ground water management, infrastructure construction and maintenance, natural hazard assessments, and future mineral exploration.

The study will take about 70 days to collect the data and the interpretation of the results is expected to take another year to produce the 3D geological map.

The Goelogical Survey of Victoria is collaborating with the Commonwealth’s Geoscience Australia, the Geological Survey of New South Wales and AuScope Limited, a non-profit geoscience company.

“This survey will help us understand how Victoria’s geology was formed, and what lies deep beneath our feet,” said Victorian Minister for Resources Tim Pallas.

“The results will help regional communities understand aspects of the environment that are vitally important to them, such as ground water systems, and improve land use decisions in the future,” he said.


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