McConnell Dowell awarded Archer River Crossing contract

McConnell Dowell awarded Archer River Crossing contract
Image courtesy of McConnell Dowell.

McConnell Dowell has been selected by the Department of Transport and Main Roads (TMR) in Queensland as the contractor to deliver the Archer River Crossing project.

The project is part of the $237.5 million Cape York Region Package stage two project, which aims to improve the safety and reliability of the road connection providing access to some of Queensland’s most remote communities.

The Archer River Crossing project includes: a new 230 metre long (11x 21 metre spans), 10.4 metre wide deck bridge over Archer River, vertical alignment modification to improve resilience to flooding, bitumen surfacing, earthworks and drainage, as well as guardrails, signs, and pavement marking.

The new bridge at Archer River will be located around 20 metres downstream of the existing crossing, with abutments and piers supported by three 1200 millimetre diameter columns.

Cape York Region Package was a five-year (2014-15 to 2018-19) program of works jointly funded by the Australian and Queensland Governments to upgrade critical infrastructure on Cape York Peninsula.

The first stages saw 173 kilometres of the 527-kilometre Peninsula Developmental Road (PDR) sealed between Laura and the Rio Tinto boundary. Stage two of the project will see a further 55 kilometres of the PDR sealed, leaving only 149 kilometres unsealed.

A McConnell Dowell spokesperson said the company had an “outstanding track record in delivering transport infrastructure across Australia”.

“This project aligns perfectly with our Purpose of ‘Providing a Better Life’ with this critical infrastructure delivering long-term positive benefits to the community.  We look forward to working with TMR to deliver this important infrastructure upgrade,” they said.

Works on the Archer River Crossing project are expected to be completed by 2024.

For more information on the project, click here.

 


 

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