Industry News, Latest News, Road infrastructure, Western Australia

Ranford Road Bridge open for business

Construction is now complete on the Ranford Bridge, with traffic now flowing on the new bridge, which was delivered as part of the $1.352 billion Thornlie-Cockburn Link project in Western Australia.

Construction is now complete on the Ranford Bridge, with traffic now flowing on the new bridge, which was delivered as part of the $1.352 billion Thornlie-Cockburn Link project in Western Australia.

The significantly enhanced bridge, consisting of 140,000 kilograms of reinforcing steel, as well as 154 piles replaces the old bridge that was too low to support the new passenger rail below.

The original bridge had only two lanes in each direction with the new bridge expected to cater for an estimated average two-way traffic flow of 43,000 vehicles a day.

The new Ranford Road Bridge is 1.2 metres higher, 15 metres longer and significantly wider – including six general traffic lanes (three in each direction), plus a dedicated bus lane and shared path for pedestrians and cyclists on each side.

The bridge construction also comprised of 10 beams each weighing 197 tonnes, along with 730 cubic metres of concrete.


 

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Works are continuing on the Thornlie-Cockburn Link project, which is scheduled for completion in 2025. The project will deliver the first east-west rail link between the Mandurah and Armadale Line, with two new stations built at Ranford Road and Nicholson Road.

The $1.352 billion Thornlie-Cockburn Link project is jointly funded by the Western Australian and Federal governments.

Federal Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government Minister Catherine King said the upgrade has delivered a long-needed road link.

“It’s great to see the completion of this bridge project which now means a safer, smoother and more efficient link along Ranford Road, better catering for the large amount of traffic and huge weight involved in enabling that amount of traffic to constantly cross the bridge,” King said.

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